Tag Archives: mugs

Ladysmith Spring Art Tour with JoVic Pottery

Vase 21" tall with a gorgeous bouquet to gild it
Vase 21″ tall with a gorgeous bouquet to gild it

The Ladysmith Spring Art Tour is set to start on April 24, 2015. It will run from 10 – 4 pm on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Our own studio, JoVic Pottery, is open until 5:00 pm. Use this wonderful opportunity by taking the self-guided tour  to meet the artists in your neighborhood. Pottery, Glass, Printmaking, Painting, Hand hooked rugs, and so much more. You can also head to the tour Facebook page for more information and some images of the kind of work you’ll be seeing on the tour.

There are loads of beautiful new pots at our studio here in Ladysmith on Vancouver Island, including the always collectible Mocha and Crawl or Alligator glazed mugs.

Ginger Jar by Vic Duffhues Micro-crystalline & Ash Glazes $175
Ginger Jar by Vic Duffhues
Micro-crystalline & Ash Glazes

There are wonderful vases, lidded vessels, teapots, and so much more freshly coming from the kiln today and tomorrow. Be sure to stop by, making it a special weekend, checking out the lovely gardens filled with beautiful rhododendron blooms, apple blossom, dogwood blossom, azaleas and more. Yes, come celebrate spring with us.

Feel free to wander the garden, the studio and our showroom. Meanwhile, we’ll do our best to ask for sunny days while you travel our beautiful area.

Crawl-Glazed Vase with Blue interior $250
Crawl-Glazed Vase with Blue interior $250

 

Garden City Potters at JoVic Pottery

We always love to teach and share some of our techniques with other potters, particularly those coming to our studio in Ladysmith BC, on Vancouver Island  via a guild appointment for a seminar, workshop or simply to see some demonstrations.

We truly enjoyed a recent visit from the Victoria, Vancouver Island potters of the Garden City Guild. Their pleasure throughout the day was more than evident. Lots of great questions made their delight and appreciation clear.

In particular, these potters loved learning about some of our “tools” invented to make our work easier. Vic Duffhues demonstrated wheel-throwing, waxing, trimming, handling techniques and more, showing these potters how he makes goblets, mugs, pansy rings, teapot lids and soap pumps. They also loved the clay art tiles in our kitchen and bathroom, and loved the garden sculptures by Jo Duffhues.

One of the best things about doing these workshops is that we always feel renewed ourselves. Excitement is contagious. We know these potters will go home to, as Pete Pinnell once wisely said: “imitate, assimilate and then innovate.”

We wish them all the best success with their own pottery and clay art and hope they will make a few return visits to JoVic Pottery in the years to follow.

Jo and Vic Duffhues
Jo and Vic Duffhues

 

Patience and Pottery Cycles

Vic shaping a pitcher on the wheel
Vic shaping a pitcher on the wheel

There are so many things that provide artists with fairly quick results; photography, some styles of painting, drawing…. It does not take too long before these artists know whether or not they’ve achieved their desired results.

2015-02-11 12.47.47
Squeezing a neck and spout into the pitcher

Of course there are many other arts that require patience, and that’s certainly true for pottery. Even so-called rapid fire methods, like raku, still require time and patience.

Making a Spout
Beginning to Form the Spout

With stoneware pottery waiting for the final results can be a very slow process. From mixing and preparing clay, through creating with clay, drying it, adding engobes or slips, drying a little more, adding handles or knobs or spouts, and drying a little more.

Pitcher Throat
Forming the throat of a spout.

Bisque firing the work, and hoping you’ve dried it enough to prevent warping or cracks from appearing, or engobes flaking off.

Finishing the Details
Finishing the Details

Adding dipped, poured, or sprayed layers of glazes. Drying the pottery again. Oh yes, and drying a full day between the layers to ensure that each glaze is completely dry before another layer is added.

Rack with pottery drying
Pots drying… waiting for trimming, handles and more

Possible firing another bisque, but this time with glazes on the work.

Handled Pitchers Drying
Handled Pitchers Drying

Waxing the pottery in places where you don’t want further glazes to adhere, especially the bases of the pots that stand on shelves in the kiln.

A Sweet Handled Pitcher
A Sweet Handled Pitcher

Applying additional glazes, and then waiting for these to dry before carefully loading the kiln for that all important final glaze temperature firing.

Trimmed Pots and Orders Drying
Trimmed Pots and Orders Drying

Of course it’s important to try to maximize the work coming out of a kiln. That means waiting until you have assorted sized items to take advantage of the space available. Yes, tons of waiting between every step.

Throwing a pitcher
Carefully Loaded Kiln

Once you’ve gone through all these steps you’ve probably been waiting anywhere from 6 weeks to 2 months for some of those special pots to make it to the shelves in your showroom. In fact, you sometimes wait so long you can’t remember what you were hoping to see. Maybe the waiting is a good thing; after all, every time you unload a glaze firing, you’re surprised, and while not every surprise is wonderful, you’re always excited and sometimes blissfully happy.

Unloading a Glaze Fire
Ah yes, time to unload the kiln. Say “ooooh.”

 

Glaze Chemistry and Testing to Create New Art

One of the things we love about being artists as well as artisans and also potters (and yes, the distinction is deliberate) is the fact that we are able to continue to experiment with a vision to always improving all our work. Our studio is not limited to work that creates art for art’s sake. We also create functional stoneware, and by its nature, this means a certain amount of production, in other words, repetition. Without the added joy of striving to make this work fresh by developing new glazes and styles, we’d soon reach a level of boredom and mediocrity that would make our work become a form of drudgery.

Years of experience and practice naturally also changes the work. Our own growth, starting in 1979, stems from the knowledge gleaned from many years of such practice and experience. However, our work is also a reflection of our interests, and is additionally influenced by the nature around us here on beautiful Vancouver Island. Testing glazes, developing new approaches, searching for ways to bring our vision to life helps us to bring a reality to our vision.

Former Glaze Tests
Old Test Tiles Find a Spot in the Garden, and yes, it’s time for a Spring Cleanup.

Vic has become more and more keenly interested in pushing limits when it comes to glazing, and these days he loves spraying layer after layer of glaze on some of his pots. Unlike other potters who traditionally limit techniques that might use ash or crawl glazes to decorative pottery, Vic enjoys seeking ways to incorporate these techniques into production and functional ware. His goal is to make each piece, whether it be a mug, a goblet, a bowl, an urn, a teapot, or those incredibly unique one-of-a-kind decorative items into art. Functional stoneware pottery is the bread and butter income for our studio, while the decorative work is the dessert. But since every single piece created is made by hand, it needs to fulfill us at a creative level too.

Glaze Test Tubes
Glaze tests on tubes allow us to gauge texture, flux, color, etc.

I found myself thinking about the development of our glaze technology over the years. Initially my own experiments involved learning about each of the ingredients by firing them separately onto small bowls. This let me see what worked as a flux and what worked to stiffen and so on. The next step involved combining these elements to understand what happened in synergy. My original glaze tests were all done by trial and error. I learned heaps, but the results weren’t often exciting or of use. Even the glaze chemistry courses didn’t add much to my working results. In time we learned about glaze unity and began to understand much more about the interaction between elements at different temperatures and using varying approaches to bringing our kilns to our desired temperature, or holding the work to soak at a specific temperature, or cooling the work in specific cycles. Of course many of those things weren’t really possible either before the onset of computer controlled kilns which we can set up to suit ourselves.

Picasso, one of the most prolific artists of all time, started out by following the rules before intentionally breaking them and developing his unique style. Likewise, authors like James Joyce, intentionally breaking all the norms of English, stands out for us as a literary giant. Sometimes people who read such works are confused, as are those people who just don’t get cubism, or abstract art. I would say that the artist who not only understands and can follow the rules of art is also the artist who can choose to break those rules. Isn’t that actually the mark of true art–a way to move forward and find a new expression for your work?

Cylindrical Glaze Tests
Our final glaze tests look at impact of layering glazes on a cylindrical form.

The joy of creating is fraught with failure–at least in terms of work that we can sell and earn from. But there is no failure at all when the work teaches us so much, and when it both teaches and delights us, it keeps us interested. We continue to strive for ways to break the rules and find new expression.

 

The Work is Coming Through at JoVic Pottery–Ready for the Tour

With the Annual Christmas Studio Tour less than a week away, things are at their most hectic at JoVic Pottery. We still have pots drying and readied for one more bisque firing. Including the always special  and rare mugs with mocha diffusion tree decoration.

Mocha Mugs Drying
Mocha Mugs Drying

 

DSC_5078
A Bisque Load

We’re unloading lovely bisque firings to keep us busy glazing.

DSC_5075
Comfortable and Beautiful Belly Mug

And, of course, we’re also unloading some extremely exciting finished stoneware firings with our unique approach to crawl glazes and layered glaze decorations. We even have the popular belly mugs, travel mugs, and arthritis tumblers coming through.

DSC_5072
Functional and Beautiful Stoneware with Crawl Glazes

For those who love to enjoy a good glass of wine in the best goblets around–yes, goblets and wine bricks are coming through now too. The goblets are also great for hot toddies and those very special Irish coffees.

Don’t miss the terrific 5-day self-guided studio tour. It’s the perfect way to get into the holiday spirit and find just the right gifts for your family and friends–or maybe just to spoil yourself.cyartisans tour

The tour runs from November 19 through the 23rd and the hours are 10-5 daily. We have brochures with maps at our studio and we’re glad to help you prepare for the fun. And yes, we’ll have our hot cider and some delicious snacks for you to nibble while you browse as well as Carol’s beautiful wreathes–fundraising for Haven House.

Getting Ready for the Country Christmas Tour

With the Cedar and Yellow Point Artisans’ Christmas Tour just 10 days away, the studio is absolutely humming. Lots of beautiful stoneware pottery is drying and waiting for the final bisque firings, including those highly favored mugs.

Pottery Mugs Drying
Pulled Handles on Drying Mugs

And the work continues for special custom orders meant for Christmas gifts, including hexagon shaped dinnerware plates and dessert plates… though working around a studio dog can sometimes proves tricky.

The Studio Dog
The Studio Dog

Of course some of the pottery that has been through the multiple firings is now beginning to find its way into our showroom.

JoVic Pottery Wine Brick and Goblets with Crawl Glaze
Wine Brick and Goblets with Alligator Crawl Glaze by Vic Duffhues

This year’s studio tour will run a full five days. Be sure to pick up a brochure at our studio and enjoy yourself on this lovely self-guided tour through our beautiful area just north of Ladysmith and south of Nanaimo in the Cedar and Yellow Point area of Vancouver Island.cyartisans tour

You’ll find an endless variety of beautiful hand-made gifts, in our own studio and in the many other wonderful studios and gift cottages taking part in the wonderful annual event.

Pitcher with Alligator Crawl Glaze from JoVic Pottery
Crawl Glaze Jug by Vic Duffhues

Tour hours are 10-5 daily, November 19 – 23. and there’s a terrific map in the brochure.

JoVic Pottery–New Work for Arts on the Avenue

Pottery Booth
Pottery Booth

Arts on the Avenue is just a few days away–this coming Sunday. This is the 16th or 17th (not sure) time this fabulous event will take place in Ladysmith. You can peruse some of the pictures taken last year by clicking on this link to the Gallery. You will, as always, find us there too. We try to make sure that every year has us bringing some of our newest work for this home-town street event.

This year’s line-up of artists is as terrific as ever, and we’re counting on the weather to cooperate and make this another fabulous day. But let me tell you about some of the fabulous pottery we’ll have ready for our collectors and new customers alike… better yet, let me show you.

Alligator Sphere Vase
Spherical Alligator Crawl-glazed Vase
Textured Spherical Alligator Vase
Bronze-Necked Alligator Vase

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The stoneware pot shown above is definitely one of my favorites to come out of the kiln this past week. Vic’s alligator finish, layered engobes and glazes, and the gorgeous form, all work together to invite the eye and hands to love this vase. Ah yes, this one is worth drooling over.

There are other gorgeous vases too… including the one shown right with a delicious fat bronze detail on the neck.

Ash Glazed Mug
Ash Glazed Mug

 

 

 

Of course we will have a series of gorgeous mugs, and some of them will have that fabulous layered alligator finish, but we also have a few with a new ash-glazed combination that is really stunning. The ash comes from the Mount Saint Helen’s eruption.

And there are some lovely tea lights coming out of the last few firings–they’re perfect for romantic dinners, relaxing atmospheres for that soothing bath, or just simple soft mood lighting.

Ash Glaze Tea Light
Tea Lamp with Ash Glaze

We’re excited to continue to enjoy the beauty of our Vancouver Island home here in the Oyster Bay area of Ladysmith, BC. It’s a place that constantly provides inspiration–but come and see for yourself and discover why so many artists, artisans and talented crafts people make this place home.

 

Find JoVic Pottery at Arts on the Avenue

Wet Mugs
Freshly Thrown

Summer is upon us and we’re gearing up for the annual Arts on the Avenue show. This special event has been running for about 16 years, and this year’s line-up of fabulous artists promises to make for another exceptionally beautiful day. It takes place on August 24, 2014. The location is First Avenue in Ladysmith, between Warren and Buller Streets. They, of course, will be closed to traffic, making for a delightful pedestrian experience. So come on out between 10 AM and 4 PM for an incredible day overlooking Oyster Harbour.

mug handles
Handles Waiting for Attachment

We’re hard at work in our own studio to make sure that we have everyone’s favourite mugs on hand for this show–and plenty of them too. They’ll be “muscled” or “textured” for that personal comfortable fit. Making mugs requires so much more effort than many people realize. Aside from mixing, pugging, wedging, and weighing out the appropriate clay balls for throwing on the wheel, our mugs also have to stiffen to a leather-hard stage before they can be handled.

pulling handle
getting it right

Vic likes to “pull” the handles, but to ensure consistently beautiful handles, he starts by preparing a whack of them ahead before attaching to the stiffened mugs and then pulling them into shape almost using a “cow-milking” motion.

The mugs are then carefully dried before they can be put through a low-temperature bisque fire in advance of receiving layers of glazes and engobes. Much of our work now experiences several low-fire applications of engobe and glazes before a final glaze firing can take place.

Welcome to Our Studio
Welcome to Our Studio

If you can’t make it to Arts on the Avenue, don’t worry, our studio is open and we’re always glad to welcome visitors. Our garden is still in bloom, and we’re right near Page Point Inn. We’re also more than happy to tell you about our community here, and have brochures that will guide you on the Cedar and Yellow Point Artisan Trail.

Arts on the AvenueBe sure to enjoy Vancouver Island’s stunning beauty and the artists and artisans who find their inspiration all around.

JoVic Pottery Studio Tour Nov. 21 – 24

The Wonderful Annual Cedar and Yellow Point Artisan Christmas Tour is just a couple of days away. The studio is buzzing with activity. Some of the work that will be out on the shelves is cooling now and will be out of the kiln today. Vic’s amazing alligator-glazed functional and decorative stoneware will fill our showroom with everything from mugs and vases to casseroles.

Teapots and mugs and more
Teapots and more…

Jo’s new series, “Quilting on Clay” is truly exciting. Using under glazes on stoneware clay when it’s bone dry can be a little nerve-wracking. As long as clay has not been contaminated or fired, it can usually be re-claimed. However, once I start adding those under glazes, I’m committed to getting it right or tossing it out.

Platter with Quilt design un-fired
Un-fired, quilted tray…

If the work only took an hour or so, that would not be a real problem. But these pieces can take up to two full days to paint.

Pots with Quilt Designs
Quilterly Painted Clay Art

It’s my love of quilting and needlepoint, both former hobbies that I no longer have time for, that inspire this creative line. I can remember spending time years ago searching fabrics that complimented my choices for making a quilt. When I do this work with clay, I don’t have to choose the fabric designed by others, I get to create the look of my own fabrics while I design the quilt I have in mind.

Quilted Tray with Birds on Blues
Birds on a Blue Quilt

The work is moving from forms with folk-art painterly fabric approaches to more traditional quilt backgrounds and even to backgrounds with the feel of a final applique design. It’s truly fun.

While not all the work has come out of the kiln yet, I’m delighted with the final results I’m seeing on some of the finished trays now.

Birds on Blue
Birds on the Blue Quilt Tray

I’m sure the tour visitors will enjoy the splashes of color from the truly exciting new pieces. There will also be a great selection of the award-winning modern art stoneware with goblets and trays and more available for people wanting to select really special hand-made gifts that will become treasured favorites this Christmas.

Mod Art Trays and Goblets
The Retro Look of Mod Art Pots

The Cedar and Yellow Point Tour starts on Thursday, November 21st and ends at 4:00 pm on Sunday, November 24th. We’ll be open from 10 – 5 throughout the tour and will have Carol’s Wreathes for Haven House as well as our usual refreshments.

Raku Pottery and Stoneware Bowls
Raku Display, and stoneware bowls

We’re truly looking forward to seeing lots of visitors at our Ladysmith, Vancouver Island Studio.  We’re offering 20% off the ticketed price of our gorgeous raku vessels for this Holiday Season. We also have a great selection of clearance pottery and that will be marked down by 50%. It’s a chance for our customers to get a truly great deal on some of the work and will make some room in the studio for the new ideas and creations we’ll want to pursue next year. It’s the 25th year of this remarkable tour and we’ll have maps to guide our visitors to some of the fine local artists in our beautiful area.