Tag Archives: Pottery

Pottery, by Jo and Vic Duffhues, Ladysmith, BC

Another Successful Studio Tour at JoVic Pottery

We’re so glad to have seen so many of our annual visitors returning again during the Cedar and Yellow Point Artisans’ Christmas Tour. This 4-day event is always fun, and a little exhausting. We spend lots of time cleaning the studio, and setting it up to give it just the right spirit. It’s worth the effort, and it’s even more wonderful when it is as successful as it was again this year. It is truly great to know that the beautiful stoneware pottery we love to make will become treasured Christmas gifts for some, while others could not resist treating themselves with some of our art.

We want to thank all our visitors, and also all the new customers that found us for the first time. We wish you the best of the season and a truly fantastic 2017.

I’m proud to say one of my favourite paintings also sold today.

Untitled, Acrylic on Gallery Canvas, by Josee Duffhues 30" x 40" $1000.
Untitled, Acrylic on Gallery Canvas, by Josee Duffhues 30″ x 40″ SOLD

JoVic Pottery and the French Connection, Exchanging Workshops

It’s been a little while since I’ve found time for this website. But we’ve been working overtime since our trip to France this past Spring. A former apprentice of ours operates his pottery studio in Bretagne, l’atelier Terre précieuse, and we enjoyed a trip that allowed exchange workshops with Olivier Ruaud and Alice Urien Ruaud.

Vic using alcohol reduction in Bretagne
Vic using alcohol reduction in Bretagne

Alice and Olivier enjoy producing the variety of their work using Raku firing techniques–in truth a process that we have given up.

Horsehair Raku
Horsehair Raku

However, after putting in more than 20 years with this technique, we had a lot to share, from using Ferric Chloride to spraying pots with alcohol to bring out the copper highlights, through to using horse-hair and feathers on hot pots.

Copper Reduction
Copper Reduction

Olivier and Alice have a beautiful studio in what might arguably be one of the most beautiful provinces in France. Their specialty is “naked raku” which relies on a white slip that cracks and allows amazing images of smoked lines on their work. In addition, they use colorful commercial glazes in concert with this naked process.

We truly enjoyed learning some of Alice’s throwing techniques, and since coming home, we’ve enjoyed creating some items that have derived from her process. It’s truly wonderful to know that we can share our skills while continuing to develop our own.

Garden City Potters at JoVic Pottery

We always love to teach and share some of our techniques with other potters, particularly those coming to our studio in Ladysmith BC, on Vancouver Island  via a guild appointment for a seminar, workshop or simply to see some demonstrations.

We truly enjoyed a recent visit from the Victoria, Vancouver Island potters of the Garden City Guild. Their pleasure throughout the day was more than evident. Lots of great questions made their delight and appreciation clear.

In particular, these potters loved learning about some of our “tools” invented to make our work easier. Vic Duffhues demonstrated wheel-throwing, waxing, trimming, handling techniques and more, showing these potters how he makes goblets, mugs, pansy rings, teapot lids and soap pumps. They also loved the clay art tiles in our kitchen and bathroom, and loved the garden sculptures by Jo Duffhues.

One of the best things about doing these workshops is that we always feel renewed ourselves. Excitement is contagious. We know these potters will go home to, as Pete Pinnell once wisely said: “imitate, assimilate and then innovate.”

We wish them all the best success with their own pottery and clay art and hope they will make a few return visits to JoVic Pottery in the years to follow.

Jo and Vic Duffhues
Jo and Vic Duffhues

 

The Joy and Disappointments Unloading Kilns

Opening Kiln, top shelf
First sight on opening looks good

Anticipation is always exciting for us here at JoVic Pottery, however, it’s also a little bit nerve-wracking. How will things turn out in this firing? We do our very best to continue to develop glazes, always pushing limits. We also continue to use those glazes we think of as tested, tried, and true, especially some of the layered glazes we so love.

Spherical Vessel
Ash and Crystalline Glazed Vessel

No matter how often we use some of these glazes, the results are never fully guaranteed. Electric kiln firings are more easily controlled now than ever before in the history of pottery, and the variety of glaze approaches available in mid-range oxidation makes the process truly exciting. We use computer controlled kilns, giving us the ability to carefully control the firing time and even some of the time we allow kilns to “soak” at a specific temperature.

Stacked kiln shelves
Stacked shelves invite a peek

But even with such controls, the firings have a way of leading to both disappointment and joy. Some pots come out of the final glaze fire giving us just what we were hoping for, some exceed those hopes, and yet others appear with unexpected flaws.

Alligator Ginger Jar with Rim Spatter
Slight rim contamination on an otherwise perfect lidded pot

The kiln furniture attests to some of the surprises thrown our way (and I do mean thrown, pitched, or perhaps spit). We find evidence on shelves that suddenly require grinding because crawl glaze spitting occurred during the firing and the bits of glaze hitting shelves has fused onto them.

glaze spit on kiln shelf
Kiln shelf with glaze spatter

We’re even more disappointed when the spitting affects nearby pottery–turning a winner into a second and affecting the bottom line when it comes to earning a living from our work. This is an added risk when we’re using layer upon layer of glaze and adding crawl glaze texture for a final firing. In other words, we’ve already spent tons of time getting the pots to this final firing, and have put in the energy, literally as well as physically, into as many as 2 or 3 previous firings.

butter dish
Note the little fired in blotch on a butter dish base

We’re experienced. We’ve been at this work for over 35 years. But that doesn’t matter in the least when it comes to the occasional failures in the final product. We get to load beautiful pieces into our kiln, knowing the quality of our work is truly awesome, but sometimes we still end up unloading a pot that just hasn’t made it to the level we’re seeking.

Unloading Lovely Pot
Vic and Ash Glazed Lidded Pot

Whether some spitting hits an interior or the beautiful rim on the base of a pot, it’s still disappointing. It’s just a good thing that the majority of what we pull from the kiln makes us feel blessed to continue our work. We’re thrilled to say there’s always something to strive toward; because as long as there is a goal ahead, we’ll want to keep working, and for potters who won’t likely ever earn a great retirement package, that’s a really good thing.

 

Getting Ready for the Country Christmas Tour

With the Cedar and Yellow Point Artisans’ Christmas Tour just 10 days away, the studio is absolutely humming. Lots of beautiful stoneware pottery is drying and waiting for the final bisque firings, including those highly favored mugs.

Pottery Mugs Drying
Pulled Handles on Drying Mugs

And the work continues for special custom orders meant for Christmas gifts, including hexagon shaped dinnerware plates and dessert plates… though working around a studio dog can sometimes proves tricky.

The Studio Dog
The Studio Dog

Of course some of the pottery that has been through the multiple firings is now beginning to find its way into our showroom.

JoVic Pottery Wine Brick and Goblets with Crawl Glaze
Wine Brick and Goblets with Alligator Crawl Glaze by Vic Duffhues

This year’s studio tour will run a full five days. Be sure to pick up a brochure at our studio and enjoy yourself on this lovely self-guided tour through our beautiful area just north of Ladysmith and south of Nanaimo in the Cedar and Yellow Point area of Vancouver Island.cyartisans tour

You’ll find an endless variety of beautiful hand-made gifts, in our own studio and in the many other wonderful studios and gift cottages taking part in the wonderful annual event.

Pitcher with Alligator Crawl Glaze from JoVic Pottery
Crawl Glaze Jug by Vic Duffhues

Tour hours are 10-5 daily, November 19 – 23. and there’s a terrific map in the brochure.

The Art and Garden Tour and JoVic Pottery

Vic's working outside

DSC_3820 DSC_3823 DSC_3829 DSC_3837 DSC_3838 DSC_3839 DSC_3841 DSC_3847 DSC_3851 DSC_3853 DSC_3854 DSC_3870 DSC_3874 DSC_3877DSC_3870It’s a truly special time of year at our studio, and not just because it’s such a pleasant time to work there once the cold and dark winter months are past, but because everything outside the studio also calls us. The garden and our amazing property provide ample inspiration, and not just a little bit of labor to our days–so thank goodness those are also a little longer as we head toward summer.

We have such an amazing yard, it simply bursts forth with life during the spring season. Trees and shrubs bloom magnificently, each year showing us their will to survive and grow. This past year saw us losing a few trees on this 3-acre patch of heaven on the outskirts of the town of Ladysmith on Vancouver Island. Like the rest of Canada, our season started much later than usual. We clearly didn’t get the massive amounts of snow that have continued to plague some parts of the country right into this usually lovely month of May, but we saw some truly chilly weather and suffered a few major wind storms. One of those trees nearly ended our wonderful Gunnera’s life. It’s coming back, but it’s so much smaller than the giant we’ve seen in previous years. It’s all coming back–a little later than usual, but more magnificent than ever.

All in all, our garden (with its quiet restful spots, its park-like areas, its rustic places and even its little memorial garden, and the tiny pond) provides us with wonder and inspiration. It suits our pottery and some of the sculpture that comes from what we see. It takes its character from this temperate coastal climate and from the ample rains of autumn and winter. It feeds birds and deer (and even some of the dreaded rabbits) and fills us with joy. Our garden is a home for wildlife and we hear the eagles kiri-ing overhead, or sometimes the raven with its amazing koo-koo-koo-koo (so lovely and different from the squawking of black birds). The hummingbirds visit the shrubs and the feeders. The raspberry finches and the quail add more to this natural beauty–yes and of course there are bees buzzing and butterflies fluttery by.

Spring is truly a magnificent time of year here, and our garden is to be celebrated. We’ve joined with some other artists in this area between Ladysmith and Chemainus just so that we can share the beauty. From June 1 to September 14 we’ll be willing to let visitors wander through not just our studios and galleries, but our gardens. So come out to the Ladysmith and District Art and Garden Tour--it’s a self-guided event–and enjoy and share in our inspiration here in the Warm Lands of Vancouver Island.

An Anniversary Gift: A Couple’s Pottery Class

Some women receive flowers or perhaps jewels or chocolates for their anniversary.Couples Class

 

We just had the pleasure of seeing a wonderful couple celebrate their special day in our studio with a wheel-throwing pottery lesson. Perhaps the movie GHOST inspired them, or maybe just the need to experience the sensual pleasure of clay together.

shared success
shared success

We’re just glad they had such a great time, and managed such wonderful success. They’ll have beautiful bowls to enjoy for years to come and we know it will always remind them of this special evening.

Congratulations to Kim and Jason.

Shopping at JoVic Pottery–Not By Cart

Vic's centering clay
Centering the Clay

After several years of operating our online shop, we have discovered that it is far easier to handle customer requests more personally and are happy to manage orders following email and telephone contact with clients.

Studio Pleasure JoThere are numerous reasons for this change. Most important of all is that it allows us greater creative freedom. As Vic puts it: “you cannot go to a GM dealership and expect to purchase a ’57 Chev.” That may seem like a stretch, but the fact is that we are constantly exploring and as a result, our work is always changing. Having a shopping cart on our site restricts us to a continuous production of items we must then have in stock. We are artists and do not operate a factory, so this goes against everything we strive for in our creation of beautiful functional and decorative stoneware and raku pottery and art.

Our collectors can always ask us to create something using a former glaze or pattern. We will do our best to meet such a request. However, mines change, clay and glaze ingredients change, standards change, and our work also changes.

We will continue to post images of our latest works on our website, and will attempt to provide our internet browsing customers with a price before taxes and shipping. If an item seem and requested has already sold, we’ll do our best to provide a similar item, exchanging emails with photographs to ensure agreement.

Our second reason for discontinuing the shopping cart feature on our site stems from the fact that that the cost calculated by the Plugins required for this online shop is, in our opinion, exorbitant as well as labor intensive. We must measure and weigh each item before we can even post an image. We must commit to specific cartons and packaging. It all boils down to a great deal of extra work before an item is even sold.

As Venture Card holders with Canada Post, we’re able to provide an excellent service which is far less cumbersome at our end when it comes to packing and shipping and is also more reasonable for our customers. We’ve been very successful shipping stoneware and even raku pottery around the world and we enjoy working with the staff at our local postal office.

Your interest in any of our work is always appreciated, and should you see something you think you’d like, we welcome an email to get things started. We will happily respond with photos and specifics to ensure your continued pleasure in our work. We will always welcome personal contact, and for those of you hoping to acquire our special dinnerware, we will always recommend a studio visit. That said, we will continue to ship our work to our collectors and welcome new customers.

Cheers,

Jo and Vic

Showroom at JoVic Pottery
Partial Peek at our Showroom