Tag Archives: texture

JoVic Pottery, Open Year-Round

Our studio, JoVic Pottery, is open pretty much all year. During the cold post-Christmas month, we do slow down, and that was especially true this past winter when we were walloped by snow storm after snow storm and cold temperatures we haven’t seen here in many decades.

Crawl or Alligator Glazed Bowl
Alligator Rim on Deep Blue Soup Bowl

But today I can tell you that production is back up, and there are lots of wonderful mugs, bowls, vases, dinnerware items, wine cups, tea pots, lidded vessels and of course Acrylic Abstract paintings practically singing in the sunshine.

Vic got into the studio even during that cold weather (despite our involvement with the Ladysmith Little Theatre and our roles in Absolutely (perhaps), he managed three dinnerware orders.

He’s also developed some exciting new ideas for dinnerware which uses the fantastic crawl glaze approach relying on multiple firings to make the glazes beautiful and durable while providing exciting texture and stunning beauty.

Blue Dinner Plate, Alligator Glazed Rim
Teal Blue Dinner with Crawl Glaze Rim
Deep Green Alligator Rim Plate

The sample images were taken with my cellphone and may not be as beautiful as the work itself. We hope visitors to our studio will take the time to see, touch and enjoy our exceptional stoneware dinnerware and artistic as well as functional pottery. There are also some amazing abstract paintings by Josee Duffhues on display.

Inspiration for JoVic Pottery in the Garden

Many potters will talk about the inspiration of previous master potters when it comes to the direction of their own work. They follow the examples set by such notable masters as Shoji Hamada, Bernard Leach, Lucie Rie and others who have had tremendous impact on the development of the modern potters following in their footsteps. But there are also potters who live in surroundings that inspire their lives and their work. We count our blessings to be among these.

White Camellia Blossoms
White Camellia Blossoms

We have also relied on the masters to hone our skills over the past 35 years, but we find that nature continuously offers us a palette that finds its way into much of what we create here at JoVic Pottery. We borrow from it to add beauty to our glazes and the textures of our work.

We have the amazing fortune of working and living in one of the most beautiful areas of British Columbia on Vancouver Island. In fact, we could say that it’s our honest belief that we live in the best part of Canada. With its temperate climate, spring always comes early to our island, erupting with colors and birdsong each new day, and constantly bringing new delight. From the red current blossoms so favored by hummingbirds, to the rhododendrons with their massive blooms, our garden brings joy.

Our studio is on our property, a 3-acre parcel which has a small creek running through and alongside of it. A wonderful right of way on one side provides tall trees that aid in creating a tranquil space, and our front yard boasts a circle of giant trees that within their midst offer respite from the heat in summer, as well as providing a contemplative oasis that practically hides us from the world. The boaters who come to Page Point Inn especially enjoy this area as a break from bright summer days, and we’re just a two-minute walk from their marina.

We are always happy to welcome visitors to our studio and property. And many of our visitors, especially those who don’t have the fortune of making their home here in the Ladysmith area, find delight in taking the time to wander through and enjoy both nature and our clay garden ornaments.  Come and see for yourself–we’ll welcome you.

 

The Joy and Disappointments Unloading Kilns

Opening Kiln, top shelf
First sight on opening looks good

Anticipation is always exciting for us here at JoVic Pottery, however, it’s also a little bit nerve-wracking. How will things turn out in this firing? We do our very best to continue to develop glazes, always pushing limits. We also continue to use those glazes we think of as tested, tried, and true, especially some of the layered glazes we so love.

Spherical Vessel
Ash and Crystalline Glazed Vessel

No matter how often we use some of these glazes, the results are never fully guaranteed. Electric kiln firings are more easily controlled now than ever before in the history of pottery, and the variety of glaze approaches available in mid-range oxidation makes the process truly exciting. We use computer controlled kilns, giving us the ability to carefully control the firing time and even some of the time we allow kilns to “soak” at a specific temperature.

Stacked kiln shelves
Stacked shelves invite a peek

But even with such controls, the firings have a way of leading to both disappointment and joy. Some pots come out of the final glaze fire giving us just what we were hoping for, some exceed those hopes, and yet others appear with unexpected flaws.

Alligator Ginger Jar with Rim Spatter
Slight rim contamination on an otherwise perfect lidded pot

The kiln furniture attests to some of the surprises thrown our way (and I do mean thrown, pitched, or perhaps spit). We find evidence on shelves that suddenly require grinding because crawl glaze spitting occurred during the firing and the bits of glaze hitting shelves has fused onto them.

glaze spit on kiln shelf
Kiln shelf with glaze spatter

We’re even more disappointed when the spitting affects nearby pottery–turning a winner into a second and affecting the bottom line when it comes to earning a living from our work. This is an added risk when we’re using layer upon layer of glaze and adding crawl glaze texture for a final firing. In other words, we’ve already spent tons of time getting the pots to this final firing, and have put in the energy, literally as well as physically, into as many as 2 or 3 previous firings.

butter dish
Note the little fired in blotch on a butter dish base

We’re experienced. We’ve been at this work for over 35 years. But that doesn’t matter in the least when it comes to the occasional failures in the final product. We get to load beautiful pieces into our kiln, knowing the quality of our work is truly awesome, but sometimes we still end up unloading a pot that just hasn’t made it to the level we’re seeking.

Unloading Lovely Pot
Vic and Ash Glazed Lidded Pot

Whether some spitting hits an interior or the beautiful rim on the base of a pot, it’s still disappointing. It’s just a good thing that the majority of what we pull from the kiln makes us feel blessed to continue our work. We’re thrilled to say there’s always something to strive toward; because as long as there is a goal ahead, we’ll want to keep working, and for potters who won’t likely ever earn a great retirement package, that’s a really good thing.