Tag Archives: Vancouver Island

JoVic Pottery is located on beautiful Vancouver Island… a lovely place for a getaway with lots of local art, bed and breakfast places, trees galore and surrounded by the Pacific Ocean

Ladysmith Spring Art Tour with JoVic Pottery

Vase 21" tall with a gorgeous bouquet to gild it
Vase 21″ tall with a gorgeous bouquet to gild it

The Ladysmith Spring Art Tour is set to start on April 24, 2015. It will run from 10 – 4 pm on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Our own studio, JoVic Pottery, is open until 5:00 pm. Use this wonderful opportunity by taking the self-guided tour  to meet the artists in your neighborhood. Pottery, Glass, Printmaking, Painting, Hand hooked rugs, and so much more. You can also head to the tour Facebook page for more information and some images of the kind of work you’ll be seeing on the tour.

There are loads of beautiful new pots at our studio here in Ladysmith on Vancouver Island, including the always collectible Mocha and Crawl or Alligator glazed mugs.

Ginger Jar by Vic Duffhues Micro-crystalline & Ash Glazes $175
Ginger Jar by Vic Duffhues
Micro-crystalline & Ash Glazes

There are wonderful vases, lidded vessels, teapots, and so much more freshly coming from the kiln today and tomorrow. Be sure to stop by, making it a special weekend, checking out the lovely gardens filled with beautiful rhododendron blooms, apple blossom, dogwood blossom, azaleas and more. Yes, come celebrate spring with us.

Feel free to wander the garden, the studio and our showroom. Meanwhile, we’ll do our best to ask for sunny days while you travel our beautiful area.

Crawl-Glazed Vase with Blue interior $250
Crawl-Glazed Vase with Blue interior $250

 

Inspiration for JoVic Pottery in the Garden

Many potters will talk about the inspiration of previous master potters when it comes to the direction of their own work. They follow the examples set by such notable masters as Shoji Hamada, Bernard Leach, Lucie Rie and others who have had tremendous impact on the development of the modern potters following in their footsteps. But there are also potters who live in surroundings that inspire their lives and their work. We count our blessings to be among these.

White Camellia Blossoms
White Camellia Blossoms

We have also relied on the masters to hone our skills over the past 35 years, but we find that nature continuously offers us a palette that finds its way into much of what we create here at JoVic Pottery. We borrow from it to add beauty to our glazes and the textures of our work.

We have the amazing fortune of working and living in one of the most beautiful areas of British Columbia on Vancouver Island. In fact, we could say that it’s our honest belief that we live in the best part of Canada. With its temperate climate, spring always comes early to our island, erupting with colors and birdsong each new day, and constantly bringing new delight. From the red current blossoms so favored by hummingbirds, to the rhododendrons with their massive blooms, our garden brings joy.

Our studio is on our property, a 3-acre parcel which has a small creek running through and alongside of it. A wonderful right of way on one side provides tall trees that aid in creating a tranquil space, and our front yard boasts a circle of giant trees that within their midst offer respite from the heat in summer, as well as providing a contemplative oasis that practically hides us from the world. The boaters who come to Page Point Inn especially enjoy this area as a break from bright summer days, and we’re just a two-minute walk from their marina.

We are always happy to welcome visitors to our studio and property. And many of our visitors, especially those who don’t have the fortune of making their home here in the Ladysmith area, find delight in taking the time to wander through and enjoy both nature and our clay garden ornaments.  Come and see for yourself–we’ll welcome you.

 

Glazing Excitement for Vic Duffhues of JoVic Pottery

Vic Duffhues (JoVic Pottery, Ladysmith BC) has added a few more spray guns to his collection, making the options for creating greater depth and color on his final work much more fun, and definitely more interesting.

Cleaning and checking a glazed rim
Cleaning and checking a glazed rim

Each application is allowed to dry carefully before another application takes place, but in this particular approach, with less glaze being applied in the way it is sprayed, the waiting time is not extreme as it is with multiple dipped applications.

This vase gets a thumbs up...
This vase gets a thumbs up…

He’s clearly enjoying the work with this series of teapots and vases on the previously bisqued ware.

A variety of sprayed glazes on teapots
A variety of sprayed glazes on teapots

It will be fun to see the final results and I’ll be sure to post more pictures.

Bisqued Teapot being glazed
Bisqued Teapot being glazed

 

 

Garden City Potters at JoVic Pottery

We always love to teach and share some of our techniques with other potters, particularly those coming to our studio in Ladysmith BC, on Vancouver Island  via a guild appointment for a seminar, workshop or simply to see some demonstrations.

We truly enjoyed a recent visit from the Victoria, Vancouver Island potters of the Garden City Guild. Their pleasure throughout the day was more than evident. Lots of great questions made their delight and appreciation clear.

In particular, these potters loved learning about some of our “tools” invented to make our work easier. Vic Duffhues demonstrated wheel-throwing, waxing, trimming, handling techniques and more, showing these potters how he makes goblets, mugs, pansy rings, teapot lids and soap pumps. They also loved the clay art tiles in our kitchen and bathroom, and loved the garden sculptures by Jo Duffhues.

One of the best things about doing these workshops is that we always feel renewed ourselves. Excitement is contagious. We know these potters will go home to, as Pete Pinnell once wisely said: “imitate, assimilate and then innovate.”

We wish them all the best success with their own pottery and clay art and hope they will make a few return visits to JoVic Pottery in the years to follow.

Jo and Vic Duffhues
Jo and Vic Duffhues

 

Mocha Diffusion Mugs

Mocha Diffusion–Magic Landscape Pottery

Mocha Diffusion is a very special technique: a process that is almost magical to watch because of the very rapid way that landscapes are formed in front of your eyes.

Whenever visitors come to the studio here at JoVic Pottery, and we have the time to engage with them and show them a few things, a mocha demonstration is often at the top of the list.

Achieving success with the process on pottery often proves very difficult. Everything has to be just right for things to work. The pots need to be almost bone dry. At that stage they will rapidly absorb the slip applied. This slip is quite alkaline. The introduction of an acid can be shown by the addition of colorants to a tea made with boiled pipe tobacco.

Drying Mocha Greenware 1
Mocha Landscape Mugs Drying

If the pots are too dry, the slip just forms ugly blotches and runs. If the pots are too wet, the slip stay wet too long and the “trees” grow well beyond our desired needs right over the edges of the rims. It’s a Goldilocks process, so if the pots are just right, we can quickly make landscape strokes and add a little extra tea in those spots where we’d like a tree to “grow.” We really have a very short window in which to do this decoration and pure concentration is required, as well as a planned approach.

Mugs and Tumblers with Mocha Landscapes Ready to Fire
Mugs and Tumblers with Mocha Landscapes Ready to Fire

But for our visitors, we have a delightful solution consisting of a piece of plastic that we dip into the slip bucket. The slip stays wet, of course, but almost always works to demonstrate the technique. We watch the trees grow and continue this growth demonstrating not only the wonder of dendrite at work, but also explaining how continued moisture is undesirable on our actual work.

White background mocha mugs
Finished Mocha Mugs with White Slip Background

Vic Duffhues has been using this technique for many decades. Yet even with all that experience, he’s not always guaranteed the results he’d like. Now he chooses to exercise this form of decoration only in the early spring, when drying conditions are most easily controlled. The result is that we never have enough mocha pieces and there is always a demand by collectors.

They truly are gorgeous mugs and tumblers and we joke that these are the fastest growing trees in British Columbia.

Layering Glazes at JoVic Pottery

 

I once heard an elderly potter say “if I don’t like what I’m getting, I just fire it again.” That was not easy before potters began to fire pottery in electric kilns. In fact, those extra firings often resulted in pots for the yard, if not the garbage can.

Disappointing Glaze #1
Disappointing Twisted Sister # 1 at Mature Temperature

Firing pottery at Cone 6 in an electric kiln (in oxidation) wasn’t exciting in the past either. Potters often frowned upon the results, and those with gas or wood-fired kilns which make use of oxygen reduction to bring out the beauty of their glazes swore they would never switch to oxidation. You just could not get a lot of great color development unless you were using commercial glazes–or so it was believed. How could you get that great variation in glazes on your pots if you didn’t have the magic of the reduction fired atmosphere which helped add variety and depth and interest on just a single pot?

Refired Twisted Sister # 1
Delightful Result with Re-Fired Vase 1 “Twisted Sister”

But potters love to invent, whether it’s a new tool for their use in the studio, or a new glaze to put on their beloved pots. It seems much of the fun comes from experimenting. While there are still lots of potters quickly dipping their ware in buckets of glaze (and it’s admittedly much less expensive with so little waste), many of us are also using spray booths. This requires a good safe space to work with phenomenal ventilation. It also results in lots of waste of glaze chemicals. The upside, however, is that it enables a very even coating of glaze without the dreaded unintended drips marring the final surface finish.

Not that drips aren’t sometimes desired. But for a potter to be truly happy or excited, those drips need to be placed in such a way as to enhance the work. And since we’re firing in oxidation, and we’re spraying the glazes, well then why not look for ways to enhance color and texture by spraying different glazes onto a pot.

Bad Glaze Vase 2
Disappointing Vase #2 at Mature Temperature

Yes, there’s a lot of experimenting, and not just a few disappointments to contend with along the way. Each glaze causes reactions within the heat of that kiln, and some of those reactions aren’t just to the heat, but to the different glazes introduced.

Twisted Sister # 2 Beauty
Gorgeous Re-Fired Twisted Sister # 2

But back to the original statement, about firing again; it is now not just to salvage failure, we re-fire with intent. We increase the number of firings in order to bring about results we could not otherwise have with the typical bisque followed by one glaze fire. We don’t just add the exciting variety that potters formerly achieved with gas or wood-fired kilns: we have taken that to brand new heights. We don’t have to spray a pot evenly with just one color, we can use bits here and there, spraying gently, choosing a heavier application here and lighter one there.

After our initial bisque firing, we fire glazed pots at lower temperatures to ensure that the glazes adhere or you might say that they are baked on, usually at cone 04 somewhere in the neighborhood of 1900 ° F. Sometimes we add more glazes and again fire at that low temperature before finally firing our pots to maturity (or to a stoneware state)  at Cone 6, approximately 2200 ° F.  Some pots may have 3, 4, or even 5 firings before we decide they’re finished and ready to sell.

For a final finish, some of our pots are treated to a crawl glaze application, and this, too, is comical when we think about the former “taboo” of having a glaze crawl on our pottery.

Bisque Fire Glaze Load
Loading a Low Temp Fire in Electric Kiln

With electric oxidation firing, we can play to our heart’s content. We can introduce and generally control the crawl so that it enhances our work. And that’s true for our ash glaze applications as well. Ash glazes tend to run, but instead of worrying about the runs, we carefully introduce them just where we know they are likely to bring about some incredible beauty. The pots that in ages past relied on wood ash to create their glazes, well, I guess we’ve experimented and found ways of using them in an electric oxidation atmosphere.

Crawl Glazed Urn
Crawl Glaze Control on Beautiful Lidded Vessel

And just like that elderly potter, we’re happy to believe that we can even re-fire a pot that had previously reached stoneware maturity.

Glaze Chemistry and Testing to Create New Art

One of the things we love about being artists as well as artisans and also potters (and yes, the distinction is deliberate) is the fact that we are able to continue to experiment with a vision to always improving all our work. Our studio is not limited to work that creates art for art’s sake. We also create functional stoneware, and by its nature, this means a certain amount of production, in other words, repetition. Without the added joy of striving to make this work fresh by developing new glazes and styles, we’d soon reach a level of boredom and mediocrity that would make our work become a form of drudgery.

Years of experience and practice naturally also changes the work. Our own growth, starting in 1979, stems from the knowledge gleaned from many years of such practice and experience. However, our work is also a reflection of our interests, and is additionally influenced by the nature around us here on beautiful Vancouver Island. Testing glazes, developing new approaches, searching for ways to bring our vision to life helps us to bring a reality to our vision.

Former Glaze Tests
Old Test Tiles Find a Spot in the Garden, and yes, it’s time for a Spring Cleanup.

Vic has become more and more keenly interested in pushing limits when it comes to glazing, and these days he loves spraying layer after layer of glaze on some of his pots. Unlike other potters who traditionally limit techniques that might use ash or crawl glazes to decorative pottery, Vic enjoys seeking ways to incorporate these techniques into production and functional ware. His goal is to make each piece, whether it be a mug, a goblet, a bowl, an urn, a teapot, or those incredibly unique one-of-a-kind decorative items into art. Functional stoneware pottery is the bread and butter income for our studio, while the decorative work is the dessert. But since every single piece created is made by hand, it needs to fulfill us at a creative level too.

Glaze Test Tubes
Glaze tests on tubes allow us to gauge texture, flux, color, etc.

I found myself thinking about the development of our glaze technology over the years. Initially my own experiments involved learning about each of the ingredients by firing them separately onto small bowls. This let me see what worked as a flux and what worked to stiffen and so on. The next step involved combining these elements to understand what happened in synergy. My original glaze tests were all done by trial and error. I learned heaps, but the results weren’t often exciting or of use. Even the glaze chemistry courses didn’t add much to my working results. In time we learned about glaze unity and began to understand much more about the interaction between elements at different temperatures and using varying approaches to bringing our kilns to our desired temperature, or holding the work to soak at a specific temperature, or cooling the work in specific cycles. Of course many of those things weren’t really possible either before the onset of computer controlled kilns which we can set up to suit ourselves.

Picasso, one of the most prolific artists of all time, started out by following the rules before intentionally breaking them and developing his unique style. Likewise, authors like James Joyce, intentionally breaking all the norms of English, stands out for us as a literary giant. Sometimes people who read such works are confused, as are those people who just don’t get cubism, or abstract art. I would say that the artist who not only understands and can follow the rules of art is also the artist who can choose to break those rules. Isn’t that actually the mark of true art–a way to move forward and find a new expression for your work?

Cylindrical Glaze Tests
Our final glaze tests look at impact of layering glazes on a cylindrical form.

The joy of creating is fraught with failure–at least in terms of work that we can sell and earn from. But there is no failure at all when the work teaches us so much, and when it both teaches and delights us, it keeps us interested. We continue to strive for ways to break the rules and find new expression.

 

New Pottery with Ash Glazes by Vic Duffhues, JoVic Pottery

There’s some exciting new work coming out of the kilns at JoVic Pottery in Ladysmith, BC. Vic’s been experimenting with layered ash glazes, and has gone a bit beyond layering with engobes and 4 glazes, now going up to 6 glazes. The results are stupendous, and when combined with techniques that allow for the glazes to “break” on tactile surfaces, well, WOW. Here’s the most recent platter. I’m sure you’ll agree this one is beautiful!

Mt. St. Helen's Ash Glazed Platter with Multiple Glaze Layers, Vic Duffhues
Volcanic Ash Glazed Platter by Vic Duffhues, $175

 

 

Getting Ready for the Country Christmas Tour

With the Cedar and Yellow Point Artisans’ Christmas Tour just 10 days away, the studio is absolutely humming. Lots of beautiful stoneware pottery is drying and waiting for the final bisque firings, including those highly favored mugs.

Pottery Mugs Drying
Pulled Handles on Drying Mugs

And the work continues for special custom orders meant for Christmas gifts, including hexagon shaped dinnerware plates and dessert plates… though working around a studio dog can sometimes proves tricky.

The Studio Dog
The Studio Dog

Of course some of the pottery that has been through the multiple firings is now beginning to find its way into our showroom.

JoVic Pottery Wine Brick and Goblets with Crawl Glaze
Wine Brick and Goblets with Alligator Crawl Glaze by Vic Duffhues

This year’s studio tour will run a full five days. Be sure to pick up a brochure at our studio and enjoy yourself on this lovely self-guided tour through our beautiful area just north of Ladysmith and south of Nanaimo in the Cedar and Yellow Point area of Vancouver Island.cyartisans tour

You’ll find an endless variety of beautiful hand-made gifts, in our own studio and in the many other wonderful studios and gift cottages taking part in the wonderful annual event.

Pitcher with Alligator Crawl Glaze from JoVic Pottery
Crawl Glaze Jug by Vic Duffhues

Tour hours are 10-5 daily, November 19 – 23. and there’s a terrific map in the brochure.

Vic Duffhues, Potter from 1979 to Today.

This post is just a fun way to share some pictures I took of my favorite potter the other day. He’s gearing up for our annual studio tour. I’m so glad he continues to love working this way and he’s been making pots since 1979, and has certainly honed his skills at our amazing Ladysmith, Vancouver Island studio: JoVic Pottery. Come visit.

Wheel-throwing
Throwing on the Wheel
Vic's centering clay
Centering the Clay
Smiling Vic at Wheel
The Happy Potter

2014 Christmas Artisans’ Tour starts at JoVic Pottery

DSC_4874
Colorful Pottery by Jo and Vic Duffhues

This year, the annual Cedar and Yellow Point Artisans’ Christmas Tour will start at JoVic Pottery. The tour starts on November 19th and runs for a full five days through to and including Sunday, November 23rd.  We’ll have lots of extra brochures for those of you who have yet to get your hands on one. It’s an exciting tour, and the brochure provides a terrific map to assist you on this self-guided foray into the studios and gift shops of the members of this arts association.

DSC_4867
Another JoVic Pottery Showroom View

Whether you’re looking for art to add to your own collection or some gifts for those lucky recipients on your Christmas gift list, you’re bound to find something special. There’s fabulous variety available too: amazing First Nations art by Noel Brown, whose artistry can be found in galleries around the globe and includes hand carved copper, silver, gold and platinum jewelry as well as traditional cedar carvings; glass work created by Ted Jolda, including his collectible Christmas: paintings, prints and more by the talented Kathy Barnson; and more paintings by Lauren Kent; furniture and wood works painted by the award winning Claudia Lohmann; furniture and jewellery from Yonder Wood; up-cycled funky functional furniture and natural art at the Fern and Feather. But that’s not all, there are wonderful studios that specialize in plants, seeds, herbs and herbal products for your home and garden, including: Hazelwood Herb Farm, Fern Gully Garden, and Seeds of Victoria. Foodies will find special gifts and delicious ingredients at Fredrich’s Honey and Yellow Point Cranberries. There are some quilts, and special Christmas temptations at some of the other locations as well from quilts to iron works, and of course you’ll find our stunning functional and decorative stoneware and raku pottery here at JoVic Pottery, and more pottery at the Blue Ox too.

DSC_4872
And Some Special Decorative Pottery by Vic Duffhues

Plan to make the tour into a few fun days. With some terrific dining choices, from the Crow and Gate, the Wheatsheaf Pub, The CoCo Cafe,  to The Cottonwood Golf Club, and some outstanding Bed & Breakfast choices in our area, you’ll be on a holiday getting ready for the holidays to follow. Check the map for yourself, and enjoy a great stay in our beautiful community on Vancouver Island. JoVic Showroom Lit Shelves

 

The Art of Fire 2

It’s a little late, but with luck, not too late. There’s a terrific pottery sale in Parksville tomorrow. It’s at the Parksville Community Centre, 132 Jensen Avenue, from 11 AM ’till 5:00 PM. (click on the highlighted address to access the map)Layout 1

The Art Of The Fire holds it’s annual holiday pottery show and sale this Saturday, October 11, 2014 – Some of Vancouver Islands best potters will have work for sale. Come and watch how it’s done. LIVE DEMOS – Throwing and Hand-Building demo’s, great food, a raffle of wonderful pots by several potters and … Oh yeah, bring something if you could, for the local food bank.

Regular members of this group of potters include Gordon Hutchens, Jane Murray Smith, Al Bubnys, Anne Marie Veale, Sue Taylor, Gordon James, Martha James, Cori Sandler of Cori Sandler Pottery, Dee Aguilar, Larry Aguilar, Shirley Phillips,Richard Lonsdale, and Janet Moe. This year’s guest artists, delighted to join this fun event are: Vic Duffhues from JoVic Pottery, Al Knutsen, Neil and Anita Lawrence, Hanna Lewandowski, Shirley Phillips, Ellen Statz, John Robertson, and Harriet Hiemstra.

Vancouver Island potters create some of the most outstanding vessels, from the purely artistic and decorative, through to truly exciting and beautiful functional pottery. There will be refreshments served by Grandmothers to Grandmothers. Be sure to enjoy a lovely day–We hope to see you there.2014-08-19 11.53.50

JoVic Pottery–New Work for Arts on the Avenue

Pottery Booth
Pottery Booth

Arts on the Avenue is just a few days away–this coming Sunday. This is the 16th or 17th (not sure) time this fabulous event will take place in Ladysmith. You can peruse some of the pictures taken last year by clicking on this link to the Gallery. You will, as always, find us there too. We try to make sure that every year has us bringing some of our newest work for this home-town street event.

This year’s line-up of artists is as terrific as ever, and we’re counting on the weather to cooperate and make this another fabulous day. But let me tell you about some of the fabulous pottery we’ll have ready for our collectors and new customers alike… better yet, let me show you.

Alligator Sphere Vase
Spherical Alligator Crawl-glazed Vase
Textured Spherical Alligator Vase
Bronze-Necked Alligator Vase

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The stoneware pot shown above is definitely one of my favorites to come out of the kiln this past week. Vic’s alligator finish, layered engobes and glazes, and the gorgeous form, all work together to invite the eye and hands to love this vase. Ah yes, this one is worth drooling over.

There are other gorgeous vases too… including the one shown right with a delicious fat bronze detail on the neck.

Ash Glazed Mug
Ash Glazed Mug

 

 

 

Of course we will have a series of gorgeous mugs, and some of them will have that fabulous layered alligator finish, but we also have a few with a new ash-glazed combination that is really stunning. The ash comes from the Mount Saint Helen’s eruption.

And there are some lovely tea lights coming out of the last few firings–they’re perfect for romantic dinners, relaxing atmospheres for that soothing bath, or just simple soft mood lighting.

Ash Glaze Tea Light
Tea Lamp with Ash Glaze

We’re excited to continue to enjoy the beauty of our Vancouver Island home here in the Oyster Bay area of Ladysmith, BC. It’s a place that constantly provides inspiration–but come and see for yourself and discover why so many artists, artisans and talented crafts people make this place home.

 

The Art and Garden Tour and JoVic Pottery

Vic's working outside

DSC_3820 DSC_3823 DSC_3829 DSC_3837 DSC_3838 DSC_3839 DSC_3841 DSC_3847 DSC_3851 DSC_3853 DSC_3854 DSC_3870 DSC_3874 DSC_3877DSC_3870It’s a truly special time of year at our studio, and not just because it’s such a pleasant time to work there once the cold and dark winter months are past, but because everything outside the studio also calls us. The garden and our amazing property provide ample inspiration, and not just a little bit of labor to our days–so thank goodness those are also a little longer as we head toward summer.

We have such an amazing yard, it simply bursts forth with life during the spring season. Trees and shrubs bloom magnificently, each year showing us their will to survive and grow. This past year saw us losing a few trees on this 3-acre patch of heaven on the outskirts of the town of Ladysmith on Vancouver Island. Like the rest of Canada, our season started much later than usual. We clearly didn’t get the massive amounts of snow that have continued to plague some parts of the country right into this usually lovely month of May, but we saw some truly chilly weather and suffered a few major wind storms. One of those trees nearly ended our wonderful Gunnera’s life. It’s coming back, but it’s so much smaller than the giant we’ve seen in previous years. It’s all coming back–a little later than usual, but more magnificent than ever.

All in all, our garden (with its quiet restful spots, its park-like areas, its rustic places and even its little memorial garden, and the tiny pond) provides us with wonder and inspiration. It suits our pottery and some of the sculpture that comes from what we see. It takes its character from this temperate coastal climate and from the ample rains of autumn and winter. It feeds birds and deer (and even some of the dreaded rabbits) and fills us with joy. Our garden is a home for wildlife and we hear the eagles kiri-ing overhead, or sometimes the raven with its amazing koo-koo-koo-koo (so lovely and different from the squawking of black birds). The hummingbirds visit the shrubs and the feeders. The raspberry finches and the quail add more to this natural beauty–yes and of course there are bees buzzing and butterflies fluttery by.

Spring is truly a magnificent time of year here, and our garden is to be celebrated. We’ve joined with some other artists in this area between Ladysmith and Chemainus just so that we can share the beauty. From June 1 to September 14 we’ll be willing to let visitors wander through not just our studios and galleries, but our gardens. So come out to the Ladysmith and District Art and Garden Tour--it’s a self-guided event–and enjoy and share in our inspiration here in the Warm Lands of Vancouver Island.