Tag Archives: vases

Ladysmith Spring Art Tour with JoVic Pottery

Vase 21" tall with a gorgeous bouquet to gild it
Vase 21″ tall with a gorgeous bouquet to gild it

The Ladysmith Spring Art Tour is set to start on April 24, 2015. It will run from 10 – 4 pm on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Our own studio, JoVic Pottery, is open until 5:00 pm. Use this wonderful opportunity by taking the self-guided tour  to meet the artists in your neighborhood. Pottery, Glass, Printmaking, Painting, Hand hooked rugs, and so much more. You can also head to the tour Facebook page for more information and some images of the kind of work you’ll be seeing on the tour.

There are loads of beautiful new pots at our studio here in Ladysmith on Vancouver Island, including the always collectible Mocha and Crawl or Alligator glazed mugs.

Ginger Jar by Vic Duffhues Micro-crystalline & Ash Glazes $175
Ginger Jar by Vic Duffhues
Micro-crystalline & Ash Glazes

There are wonderful vases, lidded vessels, teapots, and so much more freshly coming from the kiln today and tomorrow. Be sure to stop by, making it a special weekend, checking out the lovely gardens filled with beautiful rhododendron blooms, apple blossom, dogwood blossom, azaleas and more. Yes, come celebrate spring with us.

Feel free to wander the garden, the studio and our showroom. Meanwhile, we’ll do our best to ask for sunny days while you travel our beautiful area.

Crawl-Glazed Vase with Blue interior $250
Crawl-Glazed Vase with Blue interior $250

 

Glazing Excitement for Vic Duffhues of JoVic Pottery

Vic Duffhues (JoVic Pottery, Ladysmith BC) has added a few more spray guns to his collection, making the options for creating greater depth and color on his final work much more fun, and definitely more interesting.

Cleaning and checking a glazed rim
Cleaning and checking a glazed rim

Each application is allowed to dry carefully before another application takes place, but in this particular approach, with less glaze being applied in the way it is sprayed, the waiting time is not extreme as it is with multiple dipped applications.

This vase gets a thumbs up...
This vase gets a thumbs up…

He’s clearly enjoying the work with this series of teapots and vases on the previously bisqued ware.

A variety of sprayed glazes on teapots
A variety of sprayed glazes on teapots

It will be fun to see the final results and I’ll be sure to post more pictures.

Bisqued Teapot being glazed
Bisqued Teapot being glazed

 

 

Pottery-A Slow Process

Jan 2015 wheel throwing
Vic at the wheel

The making of quality stoneware pottery, whether functional or decorative, is far from a rapid process. Aside from clay preparation, pots made require careful drying before they can even be put through their first bisque fire.  But just the making is a time consuming thing, especially for large vases that are thrown in two stages.

Two-Piece Altered Vase by Vic Duffhues
Careful finishing of joined, altered vase by Vic Duffhues

Getting the neck onto the base requires careful joining; after all, if the pot is not put together correctly, the neck would come free of the vase. Careful smoothing and finishing is needed.

Potter's Wheel with Vic
Inspired Creativity

Then there’s a process that allows us to get some color onto the pieces before a first firing–of course not until the pieces are bone dry. We often spray the work with engobes, or brush on slip.

Kiln Load with Bisque-Glazed Pots
A Bisqued Load of Partially Glazed Pots

Once the pottery is again bone dry, we’re able to place the work into the kiln for a first firing. We bring them up slowly and cool slowly as well to avoid any potential cracking or warping through this cycle.

JoVic Partially Glazed & Fired Vases
Some Vases With Initial Fired-On Glazes

The cooled pots then need waxing before we can glaze. If we didn’t wax the bottoms the pottery would end up stuck to the kiln shelves.

JoVic Wax Station
Hot Wax Set-up with Exhaust

Once the waxing is finished, we can get on with the work of glazing. This is frequently a slow process because we tend to use multiple glazes and each coat must be completely dry before we add a next layer. Bisqued pottery is still somewhat porous, and the water base of the glazes is absorbed into the work, requiring careful and total drying between each step.

Waxed Mug
Hot Waxed Base

Some of our pottery is actually put through a few low temperature firings. This ensures that the first layers of glaze are fired on, allowing us to handle the pottery without smudging or accidentally removing some of the glazes. Though the glazes in this case have not reached a mature melt, they are stable enough to handle.

Bisque-Glazed Platter and Lidded Vessels
Kiln with Bisque-Glazed Platter and Lidded Vessels to Unload

Fired on glazes really help with some of our more complicated glaze applications. Crawl glazes, for instance, cannot be applied to glazes unless they have already been fired on at a lower temperature. By their very nature, as reticulating glazes, they would pull up any immature glazes they were placed on and instead of an attractive crawl, exposing lovely sub-surface colors or glazes, they’d end up exposing some terrible peeling effect that exposed clay.

Crawl Glaze Drying on Stoneware Platter
Glaze Drying in Bowl of Platter with Waxed-Over Glaze Rim

Each kiln load has us looking forward to seeing whether what we envision at the start of making our work actually lives up to our hopes.

Vic glazing Vase
Preparing to Glaze a Vase

With the glazes applied, the final drying begins.

Glazed Vases Ready to Fire
Glazed and Drying in advance of Firing

Once we’re sure the pots are dry, we can carefully load the kiln. Great care must be taken with vertical vases that have crawl glazes applied near the base.

Kiln loading at JoVic Pottery
Stacking the kiln for a final glaze firing

A slight bump and the glaze will fall off the pot, potentially leaving bare spots where they might not be desired, and also fusing to expensive kiln shelves or other kiln furniture.

Cone 6 Firing Ready to go
A Nicely Loaded Kiln Ready to Fire

Some of the final results pleased Jo Duffhues immensely–not so Vic. He’ll likely take the vases he’s not thrilled with and apply additional glazes for yet another re-fire.

Stoneware Vase
Vic’s not happy with this?

I have to remind him that some of our customers love the pieces that he is not excited about at all. The trouble is that when we work we have an idea of the outcome we’re seeking, and if things don’t turn out that way, we tend to think it’s a failure. It’s very hard to get past that kind of negative response. But since I love these pieces, I think they’re a great success.

Stoneware Vase Feb 2015
Multi-Glazed Stoneware Vase

Yes, these are the vases that Vic is seen making in the images above. Now it’s just a question of who wins the argument–will they be fired once again?